The Big Splash: Hong Dong, the one million dollar Red Tibetan Mastiff

How much did your dog cost you? I got my dog Baab, a German Sheppard Airedale mix for $50 dollars at the pet store, at a discount with a coupon. I got my cat, Noah, an orange and white Tabby, for $60 dollars from the humane society. This seems reasonable to me, so when I hear about a dog being sold for (insert Dr. Evil impression here) One Million Dollars! My jaw drops, and I cant help but think that canine is more of a status symbol than a best friend. The million dollar dog will be cared for; it will receive food prepared by chefs, and lounge around the manson of one Chinese coal baron.
The Red Tibetan Mastiff is believed to bear the reincarnated soul of monks and nuns unworthy of heaven by some. The dog, named The Big Splash was purchased for $1.5 million dollars, it’s name translates to Hong Dong in Chinese.
Hong Dong, at eleven months, weighs 180 pounds as of right now, and it is growing. Red Tibetan Mastiffs can get up 286 pounds. Hong Dong’s breeder, Lu Liang, says that the dog is a “perfect specimen” and worth the price paid.
The owner will be able to offset some of the dogs maintenance costs if he chooses to breed it, charging $10,000 a time is said to be a reasonable amount for breeding. Which is a sound investment seeing as the offspring could later be sold for 1.5 million as their father was.
It is rumored that Buddha owned one of these dogs. The Red Tibetan Mastiff gets it’s price in part for its exclusivity, rarely seen or bred outside of Tibet, and seldom seen out of China. In the last five years the price of a pup has gone from $5,000 to its current price of 1.5 million. The dog is to a Chinese new rich, is as BMW or Mercedes is to an American businessman; a status symbol.

Hong Dong and his owner

The dog, the Red Tibetan Mastiff, has an average lifespan of fourteen years. This means that maintenance/ food cost aside, the owner has spent $107,142 a year. Hong Dong and his breed are renown for their watchdog skills, they have been used throughout history for this purpose,  guarding monasteries and sleeping soliders alike.
I personally could never spend a million dollars on a pet, for none other reason than that an animal is not an object. I got my dog and cat because I wanted to care for them, and more importantly I wanted them to love me and be a household companion. I cannot buy an animals love, although I can buy an animal, some may think that these are the same thing, but they are not. Hong Dong will be taken care of my people hired to do so, I am sure the owner will interact with the dog but it will not have the same companionship to it as does a one owner pet. And for a one owner pet, the price does not matter because it soon becomes more than an animal; it has become a friend.

Another Tibetan Mastiff

Sources:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1366517/Red-Tibetan-Mastiff-worlds-expensive-dog.html

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/asia/china/8383084/1-million-for-worlds-most-expensive-dog.html

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/03/16/tibetan-mastiff-most-expensive-dog-big-splash_n_836405.html

Images:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/03/16/tibetan-mastiff-most-expensive-dog-big-splash_n_836405.html

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1366517/Red-Tibetan-Mastiff-worlds-expensive-dog.html

  6 Responses to “The Million Dollar Dog”

  1. The Million Dollar Dog – @http://community.greencupboards.com/2011…

  2. it’s so beautiful <3

  3. This is stupid! I’m sorry but no dogs should cost that much. I’m asian and hong dong , “wonton”, whatever his name is too. I think he has too much money that he’s too dumb and don’t know what to do with it! He can use that for so many good reason. This article makes me feel mad and sick to my stomach. disgusted!

  4. Infomriaton is power and now I’m a !@#$ing dictator.

 Leave a Reply

(required)

(required)

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>